HydraTech Blog Posts

HydraTech Blog Posts

WORKING WITH STATE DOTS
Getting on State Approved Product Lists
Icon WriterCaleb Rutledge, 2/26/2022

As our infrastructure gets older, storm drain pipe tends to fail at the joints while the pipe remains functional. My experience with storm drain pipes in need of repair is that there is an economical, No-Dig, long-term repair to extend the life of the pipe by sealing the leaking joints. That’s why I have been promoting the HydraTite Internal Pipe Joint Seal to several DOTSs throughout the country. First, HydraTite is mechanical and unlike grout will last the lifetime of the pipe. The technology has been used by utilities for over 50 years with impeccable success. Secondly, in our current environment of cost-savings and infrastructure repairs, it can be the right tool for several culverts in your DOT district where an economic repair is considered over replacement. To get the seal used by more state DOTs, my plan is to get HydraTite recognized by state DOTs as a qualified or approved product.

 

Many state DOTs maintain a list of approved products known as APLs, but each state is different. Some states call their lists QPLs (Qualified Product Lists) and other states do not maintain a list that HydraTite and similar products would even fit on. If the state does not maintain a list that could include HydraTite, the related DOT staff is given the product’s technical information to keep on file in case a project comes up that would require it.

Video of ALDOT demo installation

3:51

However, if the state does maintain a list that HydraTite would fit on, the process of getting approved varies widely between states. Some states require a few papers to be filed, and some states require a presentation, such as the one that was recently given to Georgia. Alabama’s process included an in-person demonstration of HydraTite’s installation.

exposed culvert joint that has separated

I was invited to travel to Alabama and demonstrate HydraTite‘s ability to effectively eliminate infiltration and exfiltration. I had worked on a project before with one of our senior technicians, Rob White, but I was glad I was part of Field Services’ training for 2022, as it helped prepare me for a solo trip to Alabama. During that training, Ben Steinbrunner, another HydraTech technician, trained me on installation to make sure I knew exactly how to install HydraTite to achieve a watertight seal by myself.

separated join in culvert

I met up with an ALDOT representative who would be trained on the installation process and later help me install the HydraTite seal. We drove to the 42″ concrete culvert, where the joint of concern was separated by approximately two inches along the bottom and only an inch at the top. There was limited flow and the joint was fairly clean, except for a few abandoned mud dauber nests.

Scrapping a joint clean

Once the minimal amount of cleaning was done, butyl rubber was inserted into the joint as an extra layer of protection to prevent infiltration.

Preparing to install rubber strip in separated joint
working out rubber excess bump
rubber filler in a joint
Aligning EPDM rubber seal with the separated joint

Next, the HydraTite seal was positioned directly over the joint. I ensured sure that the ribs of the seal were equally distant from the joint and that nothing had been deposited underneath the seal by the water.

placing a steel retaining band in the rubber seal's channel
HydraTite protecting a joint that is separated
expanding a retaining band to hold a HydraTite seal in place

With the help of the ALDOT representative, the stainless steel bands went in one at a time, expanded, and then locked in place with a wedge. I inspected both sides of the seal, ensuring that it was smoothly up against the walls of the culvert. The entire process only took a few hours. Now, HydraTech is waiting for the evaluation to be completed, so we can proceed with getting HydraTite on ALDOT’s list.

Where We Stand With The States

HydraTite listed on VDOT’s NPEL.

Highlighted text showing that HydraTech is on the 'Department's Qualified Products Miscellaneous List'

Video of ALDOT demo installation

2:33

Part of a letter from TDOT regarding the HydraTite Seal.

Highlighted text showing that HydraTech is on the 'Department's Qualified Products Miscellaneous List'
A failing joint in an elliptical culvert

“These bands will provide many years of service, keeping material from falling into the culvert as well as keeping water in the culvert.” “Thanks to everyone who helped with the installation.” “Also Rob, the technician was great to work with and taught us well.” (Various representative quotes from a longer email)

Mark Hume

Region Engineer, Maine DOT

Presentation given to GDOT

3:51

In credit to HydraTite. Their customer service is excellent, they deliver as promised. Great at keeping us informed and helping us with training and any issues that came up. The product is aesthetically pleasing and meets our need for a drainage solution in a tight urbanized location.

Mike Danos

Florida DOT

HydraTite appearing on SDDOT’s APL

Highlighted text showing that HydraTech is on the 'Department's Qualified Products Miscellaneous List'

Hydra Tech was able to successfully repair these joints this past summer 2021 with their joint seals. ODOT inspected their work shortly thereafter, and everything appeared to look good.

Jeffery Meyer

Transportation Engineer, ODOT, District 8

HydraTite appearing on Colorado DOT’s APL

Highlighted text showing that HydraTech is on the 'Department's Qualified Products Miscellaneous List'
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